A Hindustani Music Concert [ Some Basic and Deeper Concepts ]

A Hindustani Music Concert : So far we have dealt with the various elements of Indian classical music separately. Let us now fuse them together in order to get an intimate feel of a short but entire concert. An Indian classical music performance means a musical journey with the artist. The artist evokes your emotion by taking you to different places of that particular raga world gradually. It is similar to making a painting. Sometimes it will give you a feeling that artist is drawing something, the next moment he/she will turn that to something else by another stroke of the brush.

In the beginning, the artist will give you an idea about the road, which is the raga. Then he/she will gradually establish some specific rules and roadmap for the journey. Then he will take you to the road by slowly walking. Then he will use different vehicles is the different parts of the journey.

Keep in mind that instrumental music and vocal music play the same raga. But the segment or vehicle they presentation will slightly varry.

We shall hear the Raga Bageshree played on the Sarod by: Buddhadeb Das Gupta.

Bageshree is an evening Raga using all the seven notes. The Vadi is Dhaivat or Dha, the sixth note, and the Samvadi is Gandhar or Ga, the third note.

Alap:

The Sarod strikes the first notes of the Alap which sets the mood for the Raga. The expression is gentle, open, and free with a slow lingering movement. It is a meditative entrance into the realm of the Raga.

Notice that the first musical phrases are woven around the notes of the lower and middle octave. The Alap uses, in its slow majestic gait, the long-drawn Meends-the glides from note to note.

Now, in the elaboration, the Vadi is brought in. Notice how it is emphasized and serves as the central point as well as the resting place for the melody and how the Samvadi acts as a counter-point.

Gradually larger and larger combinations of notes are brought into play. The musical phrases become longer and more elaborate. Observe how higher and higher notes are successively introduced and explored by means of musical phrases built around them..

Notice the use of various Alankars, as the broad ground-plan of the Raga is laid out..

A Hindustani Music Concert [ Some Basic and Deeper Concepts ], Analysis of UB_AhirBhrv alap containing 4 sections: alap-proper, jod, jhala and jalad-jhala (a) Tempo, (b) Salience or pulse clarity, (c) Posteriors of rhythm, (d) Short-time energy difference, (e) Short-time centroid difference, and (f) MFCC C-1 coefficient. Dashed lines indicate manually labeled section boundaries.
Analysis of UB_AhirBhrv alap containing 4 sections: alap-proper, jod, jhala and jalad-jhala (a) Tempo, (b) Salience or pulse clarity, (c) Posteriors of rhythm, (d) Short-time energy difference, (e) Short-time centroid difference, and (f) MFCC C-1 coefficient. Dashed lines indicate manually labeled section boundaries.

Jod:

Now comes the Jod. For the first time, a sense of simple rhythm is introduced. Usually, the first phrase is comparatively longer and is progressively broken down in its simpler combinations.

Once again longer and longer phrases appear, gradually carrying the melody to the higher octave. Mark the use of different Alankars.

The Jod fuses into the first Jhala full of quick rhythmical patterns.

Gat:

Then follows the Gat in the Vilambit-the slow pace. A Tala is introduced for the first time and the percussionist starts his accompaniment. In this piece, the Tala is of sixteen beats, called the Teental.

We note that while the musician plays the Mukh, the Tabla player feels free to present a series of variations on the Tabla. The main instrument temporarily recedes into the background and the percussionist, taking the lead, displays his skill over intricate rhythmical patterns. When the musician starts his improvisations the Tabla player returns to the simple Theka after playing a Tehayi.

Notice how first the Mukh is played and then woven into the musical phrases. These phrases are moulded on the pattern of the Alap, reminiscent of its long drawn movements. When the melody has advanced a little the musician introduces the Antara the fixed phrase played in the higher notes.

Drut:

Now the tempo increases and we arrive at the Madhyalaya or the medium pace.

Coming to Drut or the faster pace, the musician often changes the Mukh as well as the Antara. The emphasis shifts from delicate graces to speed and power. In this part, the Taans or the musical phrases become fast and quick. The musician has explored the Raga and conveyed his message. Now he finds joy in moving freely in the world of the Raga.

Jhala :

Reaching the fastest tempo, the musician shifts to the Jhala which is the concluding part of the Raga. Listen to the fast rhythmical pluckings of the Chikari strings on which are superimposed the complex patterns of the melody. The Jhala builds up the climax of the composition.

After the climax of the Jhala, the musician ends with a Tehayi-the threefold repetition of a musical phrase, which releases the tension built by the Jhala. With the Tehayi the composition comes to an end and adually the Tanpura too fades away.

Theory of Raga Bageshree:

The theoretical aspects of Bageshri are as follows:

Scale
Arohana : S g m D n S’
Avarohana : S’ n D m P D g m g R S

Vadi & Samavadi
Vadi : Madhyam (Ma)
Samavadi: Shadja (Sa)

Pakad or Chalan
D n s, m, m P D, m g R S

Varjit Swara – P & R in Aaroh
Jati : – Audhav Sampoorna
Organization & Relationships
Thaat: Kafi (raga)

Samay (Time)
The time for this raaga is madhya raatri (middle of the night).

[ A Hindustani Music Concert [ Some Basic and Deeper Concepts ] ]

Read More:

1 thought on “A Hindustani Music Concert [ Some Basic and Deeper Concepts ]”

Leave a Comment