Harmony and Form: Chapter 5 – Beginning Harmonic Analysis (Understanding Basic Music Theory)

Harmony and Form: Chapter 5 – Beginning Harmonic Analysis (Understanding Basic Music Theory) 5.5 Beginning Harmonic Analysis 5.5.1 Introduction It sounds like a very technical idea, but basic harmonic analysis just means understanding how a chord is related to the key and to the other chords in a piece of music. This can be such … Read more

Harmony and Form: Chapter 5 – Naming Other Chords (Understanding Basic Music Theory)

Harmony and Form: Chapter 5 – Naming Other Chords (Understanding Basic Music Theory)     5.4 Beyond Triads: Naming Other Chords 5.4.1 Introduction Once you know how to name triads (please see Triads and Naming Triads), you need only a few more rules to be able to name all of the most common chords. This … Read more

Harmony and Form: Chapter 5 – Consonance and Dissonance (Understanding Basic Music Theory)

Harmony and Form: Chapter 5 – Consonance and Dissonance (Understanding Basic Music Theory) 5.3 Consonance and Dissonance Notes that sound good together when played at the same time are called consonant. Chords built only of consonances sound pleasant and “stable”; you can listen to one for a long time without feeling that the music needs … Read more

Harmony and Form: Chapter 5 – Naming Triads (Understanding Basic Music Theory)

Harmony and Form: Chapter 5 – Naming Triads (Understanding Basic Music Theory) 5.2 Naming Triads The position that a chord is in does make a di erence in how it sounds, but it is a fairly small di erence. Listen4 to a G major chord in three di erent positions.     A much bigger … Read more

Harmony and Form: Chapter 5 – Triads (Understanding Basic Music Theory)

Harmony and Form: Chapter 5 – Triads (Understanding Basic Music Theory)   5.1 Triads Harmony in Western music (Section 2.8) is based on triads. Triads are simple three-note chords (Chords) built of thirds. 5.1.1 Triads in Root Position     The chords in Figure 5.1 (Triads in Root Position) are written in root position, which … Read more

Solutions to Exercises in Chapter 5 (Understanding Basic Music Theory)

Solutions to Exercises in Chapter 5 (Understanding Basic Music Theory)     Solution to Exercise 5.1.1     Solution to Exercise 5.1.2       Solution to Exercise 5.2.1     Solution to Exercise 5.2.2     Solution to Exercise 5.2.3     Solution to Exercise 5.2.4     Solution to Exercise 5.2.5     … Read more

6.1 Ear Training (Understanding Basic Music Theory)

6.1 Ear Training (Understanding Basic Music Theory)   6.1.1 What is Ear Training ? When musicians talk about ear, they don’t mean the sense organ itself so much as the brain’s ability to perceive, distinguish, and understand what the ear has heard. The term ear training refers to teaching musicians to recognize information about notes … Read more

6.2 Tuning Systems (Understanding Basic Music Theory)

6.2 Tuning Systems (Understanding Basic Music Theory)   6.2.1 Introduction: Tuning Systems The rst thing musicians must do before they can play together is “tune”. For musicians in the standard Western music tradition, this means agreeing on exactly what pitch  (what frequency (Section 3.1.4: Wavelength, Frequency, and Pitch)) is an “A”, what is a “B … Read more

6.3 Modes and Ragas (Understanding Basic Music Theory)

6.3 Modes and Ragas (Understanding Basic Music Theory)   6.3.1 Introduction: Modes and Ragas In many music traditions, including Western music, the list of all the notes that are expected or allowed in a particular piece of music is a scale. A long tradition of using scales in particular ways has trained listeners to expect … Read more

6.4 Transposition : Changing Keys (Understanding Basic Music Theory)

6.4 Transposition : Changing Keys (Understanding Basic Music Theory)   Changing the key of a piece of music is called transposing the music. Music in a major key can be transposed to any other major key; music in a minor key can be transposed to any other minor key. (Changing a piece from minor to … Read more